Basha Wide Open MRI Exams

Exams we offer



Open MRI
CT Scan X-RAY
Ultrasound Mammogram
Stress Testing Echocardiography
Cardiac Doppler Vascular Doppler
Holter Monitoring EKG
Bone Density Nuclear Diagnostics

 


Open MRI

A magnetic resonance imaging exam (MRI) is a test that uses a magnetic field and pulses of radio wave energy to create images of organs and structures inside the body. In many cases, MRI provides detailed information that cannot be seen on an X-ray, ultrasound, or computed tomography (CT) scan. 


How do I prepare for my examination?

MRI exams require no special preparation for the exam itself.  You may eat and take any medications needed as usual, except in the special case of sedation. 

If you suffer from claustrophobia, or the scan will be performed on a young child who cannot remain still, then sedation of various types may be used. Please bring such situations to the attention of your physician and the scheduling staff at Basha Diagnostics before scheduling the MRI procedure, as more detailed information will be provided to you.


What should I wear?

Please wear comfortable, loose fitting clothing without zippers, snaps, or other metal parts. You will also be asked to remove jewelry, dentures, bobby pins, makeup, credit cards, prostheses, wire support bras, or any other metal objects that might interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. A locker will be provided in a secure dressing area for clothing and belongings. You can also leave your personal items at home or with a companion.


What can I expect during my examination?

You will simply lie on your back on a special table that slides into the center of the circular magnet.  It is essential that you remain completely still during the scan, which can last anywhere from 15 minutes to 90 minutes, depending on the type of MRI exam ordered by your physician.

If you will be taking medication prescribed by your physician, or you will be undergoing sedation, please have someone else drive you to and from the facility or notify the scheduling staff at Basha – we may be able to provide free transportation to and from the appointment for you. 


More Information for Patients who are Claustrophobic or Large in Size

more info

Availability: All locations

Computed Axial Tomography ("CT" or "CAT" scan)

A way of looking inside your body using a special camera. The images (or pictures) produced are cross - sectional, like the slices in a loaf of bread. During a CT exam the scanner takes multiple cross-sectional pictures of you. These pictures are created with the help of a computer and are capable of depicting various internal body parts in much greater detail than standard X-Ray films. This greatly enhances the doctor's ability to diagnose a medical condition.

 

How do I prepare for my examination?
Patients are asked not to consume any food or liquids four hours prior to the exam for the following types of CT exams: CT Abdomen or Pelvis, CT Chest, CT Soft Tissue Neck, CT Head (Brain, IAC’s Orbits, Pituitary, TMJ, Post Fossa), CT Sinuses/ Facial Bones, CTA (Angiogram, Aorta), CT Urogram, or UGI.  For CT IVP &IV Urogram preparations, patients may be asked to take a total of four Dulcolax tablets (take 2 every 15 minutes) at 4:00 pm the preceding day.  Patients are asked not to consume any food after midnight preceding the appointment, with instructions for no fluid consumption 3 hours prior to the exam.Medications are allowed with a little water.  Please consult with your physician for more instruction.
For many CT examinations, a contrast agent (a liquid that enhances imaging of certain organs or blood vessels) will be administered. Depending on the type of examination, the contrast may be given orally, intravenously, or as an enema. If certain types of contrast will be used during an examination, the patient may be required to fast for several hours or use an enema to cleanse the colon prior to his/her appointment.  If an intravenous contrast agent will be used, the details procedure will be explained and the patient will be asked to sign a consent form.

 

What should I wear?
Comfortable, loose clothing should be worn, although in some cases a patient will be asked to change into a patient gown for the examination. It is also important to remove any metal prior to the exam: jewelry, dentures, eyeglasses, belt buckles, and metal zippers and buttons can interfere with the images.


What can I expect during my examination?
The technologist settles the patient on the scanner's "couch." The technologist glides the couch into place within the opening of the gantry, using cross-hair positioning lights to put the "target" area (for example, the chest) in the path of the x-rays.
The scanner is generally controlled by a computer in an adjacent room, which has a window facing the machine and patient. During this time, the technologist and patient can easily communicate through an intercom.
When images are being acquired, the patient is usually asked to hold his/her breath and remain motionless. Image acquisition typically lasts 20-30 seconds. When the scanner and patient couch move, the patient may hear whirring or clicking noises-this is normal. In addition, the scanner may tilt forward or back to capture images from the best angle during an examination of the head, sinus, inner ear, and spine.
It is very important to lie completely still while images are being taken. Any movement can reduce the clarity of the images, and the radiologist may then have difficulty interpreting them.

Availability: Royal Oak, Sterling Heights clinics




X-Ray

The X-Ray has been called one of the most significant advances in all of medical history. It is used in many different ways in medical diagnosis. An x-ray image is produced when a small amount of radiation passes through the body and strikes a sheet of sensitive film placed on the other side of the body.

How do I prepare for my examination?
There is no prep necessary for an X-Ray exam.

For Upper Gastrointestinal series, small bowel series and A.B.D., or esophagram exams, patients are asked not to eat, drink, chew gum, or smoke after midnight until exam is complete.  After exam is complete, patients are asked to consume 2 ounces of Milk of Magnesia, drink water, and resume normal diet.For Intravenous Urogram & LAM exams, patients are asked to take a total of four Dulcolax tablets (take 2 every 15 minutes) at 4:00 pm on the preceding day.  Patients are asked not to consume anything after midnight preceding the appointment and not to consume any fluids 3 hours prior to the test.

What should I wear?
You may be asked to remove your watch, jewelry, or garments with metal closures from the part of your body being imaged.  You may also be asked to change into a patient gown, depending on the part of the body being x-rayed. Please notify the technologist prior to the exam if there is a possibility that you could be pregnant.

Availability:
All locations


Ultrasound (or "sonography")

A procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to show what is inside your body. Ultrasound is a safe, painless, non-invasive test that uses pulses of high frequency sound waves to produce an image of the body’s internal organs. These sound waves are reflected off various tissues and are converted into pictures. You do not feel these pulses of sound, nor do you hear them, because of the high frequency.

How do I prepare for my examination?

There are various preparations for different types of ultrasound examinations. For example, certain exams such as an ultrasound of the gallbladder require fasting from midnight, while other exams such as a pelvic ultrasound require the drinking of 40 oz. of fluids one hour prior to the exam. Always check with your physician to determine what type of preparation is necessary for your particular test.
For Abdominal/ Gallbladder Ultrasounds:  Patients are asked not to eat or drink (no gum chewing) after midnight prior to exam.  Patients are scheduled for appointments after 12:00 Noon are asked not to eat or drink anything at least 5 hours prior to the exam.  You may drink water.  Avoid fatty foods.  Medications are permissible with a small amount of water.

For Pelvis/Prostate Ultrasounds:  Patients are asked to drink four to five 8 ounce glasses of water one hour prior to exam.  Patients may not urinate before exam.For Obstetrical Ultrasounds: If under 4 months of pregnancy, follow same instructions as Pelvis Ultrasound.  If over 4 months pregnant, drink two 16 ounce glasses of water one hour prior to exam.  Do not urinate. 

What should I wear?

You should wear clothing that is comfortable and easy to get in and out of. A hospital gown is necessary for most exams.

What can I expect during my examination?

Before the exam begins, a technologist will ask you a series of questions about your medical history as well as the reasons why you are having the test.
You will be asked to lie down on the examination table. Warm acoustic gel will be applied to your skin to minimize the amount of air between the transducer (a special hand-held microphone which produces the sound waves) and your skin. You may be asked to hold your breath and lie in different positions while the transducer is moved across your skin.
Depending on the type of ultrasound requested, the exam may take anywhere between 15 to 40 minutes. Images will appear on a TV monitor, which will later be interpreted by a radiologist.

How will I feel after the exam?

You should feel fine and be able to resume normal activity. Please note that there are special instructions if you have had a biopsy.

Why do I need to bring previous scans?

Previous scans provide a comparative means of evaluating how much change has occurred between your current and previous examinations. This provides important information, which may influence the interpretation and diagnosis of your examination.

Learn more.

Availability:All locations

 

Mammogram




An X-Ray of the breast. As the X-Rays pass through the breast tissue, an actual image of the tissue inside is obtained.


Before The Exam

Be sure to schedule your mammogram one week after your period when your breasts are less tender. Also, make sure you notify our scheduling staff where your last mammogram was performed, so they may obtain your previous mammogram films prior to your scheduled appointment.

How do I prepare for my examination?
Please do not wear any perfumes, lotions, creams, talcum powders, deodorants or sprays when you come in for your mammogram. These applications may contain a metallic base, and could cause distortion on the image.  Also, please wear a blouse or sweater that you can remove easily.

For your safety and to get the best test results, let the technologist know if:

• You're pregnant or think you may be
• You have breast implants
• You have any scars or moles on or near your breast
• You've had a previous breast biopsy or surgery
• You're breast feeding


What can I expect during my examination?

You will be asked to undress from the waist up. The technologist will then position your breast to get the best test results. During the exam, each of your breasts will be compressed. You may feel some discomfort, but compression helps get the most complete X-Ray image. Once the exam is done, the technologist may have you wait a few minutes to make sure the images are of good quality. 

Availability: All locations

Stress testing

Exercise stress testing is performed by experienced staff. The patient's EKG and blood pressure are closely monitored throughout the test in order to evaluate the heart's response to exercise. Stress testing can be performed with or without isotope enhancement, to assess the heart's oxygen perfusion and coronary arteries blockages.


How do I prepare for my examination?

Do not eat, drink, or smoke four hours prior to your appointment (except for water). Your last meal should not include any caffeine or alcohol. Do not use any creams, lotions, oils, or powders on your body for 48 hours prior to your appointment. 


What should I wear?

Please wear the appropriate clothing.  Avoid wearing dresses, skirts, stirrup pants, panty hose, girdles, or tights.

Availability: All locations

Echocardiography

A type of ultrasound, an echocardiography (also known as a echo or echocardiogram), is a diagnostic tool that uses high-pitched sound waves to produce an image of the heart. The sound waves are sent through a transducer placed on the surface of the chest and reflect off certain areas of the heart which are then converted into pictures. This test is used to check the heart's ability to pump blood effectively throughout the body and measure how much blood is actually pumped in each contraction. This test is also used to evaluate the valve function, find evidence of heart failure, and ensure that the heart is of normal size.


How do I prepare for my examination?

Do not eat, drink, or smoke four hours prior to your appointment (except for water). Your last meal should not include any caffeine or alcohol. Do not use any creams, lotions, oils, or powders on your body for 48 hours prior to your appointment. 


What should I wear?

Please wear the appropriate clothing.  Avoid wearing dresses, skirts, stirrup pants, panty hose, girdles, or tights.

Availability: All locations

Cardiac Doppler

Cardiac Doppler
is an ultrasound test. It may be used to find leaky cardiac valves and/or the presence of tightened or stenotic valves. The test takes about 10 to 20 minutes. A transducer coated with conductive jelly will be placed on the chest and moved along the chest wall over the areas to be examined.


How do I prepare for my examination?

There are no special preparations or instructions for the exam.

Availability: All locations

Vascular Doppler

A Vascular Doppler is a diagnostic study used to determine if there is any plaque or blockage of an artery or vein using an ultrasound probe and gel. Each study averages about 1/2 hour to 1 hour per procedure.


How do I prepare for my examination?

There are no special preparations or instructions for the exam.

Availability: All locations

Holter Monitor

Holter monitoring
is a diagnostic tool to record heart rhythm and rate information that is later analyzed for arrhythmia's and other abnormalities. The holter monitor measures and record electrical impulses in the heart. Patches with wires are applied to the chest and connected to a portable monitor that can be attached to a belt or purse.


How do I prepare for my examination?

There are no special preparations or instructions for the study.

Availability: All locations

EKG

An electrocardiogram (EKG) is a recording of the electrical activity of the heart at rest. Electrodes are applied to each arm, leg, and six different areas on the chest. A short recording is made on graph paper as the person is lying still. The pattern of the printed waves can show if the heartbeat is normal, stressed, damaged or having other electrical problems. The EKG is then read by a cardiologist and the results are sent to the referring physician. Learn more.

Availability: All locations


Bone Density

Bone Density
(also known as Dexa Scan), is a bone density measurement which indicates how solid bones are, and how strongly they are fortified by calcium. Bone mineral measurements are highly correlated with bone strength and have been shown emphatically to predict fractures and the status of osteoporosis.

What can I expect during my test?

You will be asked to lie down on an examination table beneath a special x-ray machine. The technologist will prop your legs up on a pillow and scan your lower back in he lumbar spine region. The technologist will then scan your hip. The test will only take a couple of minutes.
 
How do I prepare for my exam?

No preparation is required.

What should I wear?

We suggest that you wear pants with an elastic waistband. This will allow you to remain in your own clothing for the test.



Availability: All locations

 

Nuclear Diagnostics

Nuclear Diagnostics
is a branch of radiology that uses radioactive materials to determine if certain organs such as the heart, kidneys, liver, thyroid, brain and lungs are working properly. It is also used to examine the bones for cancer, infection or trauma.

How should I prepare for the procedure?

Usually, no special preparation is needed for a nuclear medicine examination. However, for Hepatobiliary or Thallium Studies, patients are asked not to eat or drink anything at least six hours prior to the test.

What can I expect during my examination?


You are given a radiopharmaceutical, usually intravenously but sometimes orally, that localizes in specific body organ systems. This compound eventually collects in the organ and gives off energy as gamma rays. The gamma camera detects the rays and works with a computer to produce images and measurements of organs and tissues.

Depending on which type of scan is being performed, the imaging will be done either immediately, a few hours later, or even several days after the injection. Imaging time varies, generally ranging from 20 to 45 minutes.

While the images are being obtained, you must remain as still as possible. This is especially true when a series of images are obtained to show how an organ functions over time.

After the procedure, a physician with specialized training in nuclear medicine checks the quality of the images to ensure that an optimal diagnostic study has been performed.

Learn more.

Availability: All locations
 
 
 
 
   
   

 




Locations
Sterling Heights
13753 19 Mile Rd

Map
586-566-8680
Fax: 586-566-8730
Dearborn Roemer
4407 Roemer

Map
313-584-0768
Fax: 313-945-9339

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